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1905-1910 NYC: Historic Skyline Evolution & The Renaissance of Metropolitan Life

The early 20th century, specifically between 1905 and 1910, marked a pivotal shift in New York City’s architectural landscape. This period witnessed the rise of iconic structures that redefined the city’s skyline. The Singer Building, completed in 1905, soared to 47 stories, claiming the title of the world’s tallest building at the time. This architectural achievement was soon followed by the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company Tower, completed in 1909. It held the title of the tallest building until 1913, further solidifying New York City’s status as a burgeoning metropolis.

Concurrently, New York City’s subway system, inaugurated in 1904, underwent rapid expansion. The opening of the IRT Lexington Avenue Line in 1905 was instrumental in connecting the city’s diverse neighborhoods, facilitating both residential and commercial development across the boroughs. This expansion significantly transformed the city’s physical and socio-economic landscapes.

This era was marked by a significant cultural renaissance. The New York Public Library’s main branch, a standout Beaux-Arts building, began construction in 1902 and opened in 1911, symbolizing the city’s dedication to cultural enrichment. Moreover, the evolution of Broadway’s theater district, with the openings of the Hudson and New Amsterdam Theaters in 1903, mirrored the city’s expanding artistic landscape.

During this period, New York City underwent profound economic changes. Following the Panic of 1907, Wall Street emerged more robust, prompting critical banking reforms that contributed to the establishment of the Federal Reserve System in 1913. Simultaneously, the city’s population growth, fueled by immigration and urbanization, led to diverse social challenges. These included the need for new approaches to housing and public services, reflecting the city’s evolving demographics.

1905-1910 Timeline of New York City’s History, USA

A photographer shooting the skyline 18 stories above pavement of Fifth Avenue, as he sits on a thin support beam of a skyscraper under construction.

1905: Photographing NYC from 18 Stories

A photographer shooting the skyline 18 stories above pavement of Fifth Avenue, as he sits on a thin support beam of a skyscraper under construction.

A panoramic photograph of Manhattan's downtown skyline, including City Hall and the Singer Building.

1908: The Heart of Downtown New York City

A panoramic photograph of Manhattan's downtown skyline, including City Hall and the Singer Building.

Construction workers clear several stories of earth and rock to lay the groundwork for what would become one of the city's most busy transit network.

1908: Excavations for Grand Central Station

Construction workers clear several stories of earth and rock to lay the groundwork for what would become one of the city's most busy transit network.

Construction on Grand Central Terminal started on June 19, 1903, as New York state legislature would ban all steam trains in Manhattan by 1908.

1905: Construction of Grand Central Terminal

Construction on Grand Central Terminal started on June 19, 1903, as New York state legislature would ban all steam trains in Manhattan by 1908.

A straight perspective following the direction of the newly laid train tracks which would help to service thousands, and eventually millions of commuters a day.

1908: The First Tracks of Grand Central Station

A straight perspective following the direction of the newly laid train tracks which would help to service thousands, and eventually millions of commuters a day.

A crowd of pedestrians pass the entrance of Grand Central Terminal with horse carriages and trolleys visible on the street.

1908: Crowd in Front of Grand Central Terminal

A crowd of pedestrians pass the entrance of Grand Central Terminal with horse carriages and trolleys visible on the street.

Workmen risking their lives 27 stories above ground at the construction site of the new "Times" Building, New York City.

1905: Construction Workers on the 27th Floor of the New Times Building

Workmen risking their lives 27 stories above ground at the construction site of the new "Times" Building, New York City.

A daytime photograph of Times Square and the New Times Building, with pedestrians and trolleys in the foreground.

1908: Times Square, New York

A daytime photograph of Times Square and the New Times Building, with pedestrians and trolleys in the foreground.

A photograph which illustrates the great style, symmetry and lighting of Penn Station's Main Concourse.

1905: Main Concourse at Pennsylvania Station

A photograph which illustrates the great style, symmetry and lighting of Penn Station's Main Concourse.

Interior view of Penn Station's famously opulent waiting room, with its high vaulted ceilings and turn-of-the-century stonework.

1905: Main Waiting Room at Pennsylvania Station

Interior view of Penn Station's famously opulent waiting room, with its high vaulted ceilings and turn-of-the-century stonework.

Interior view of Penn Station's concourses, drenched by the sun due to the greenhouse-inspired design of its glass ceiling.

1905: Track Level and Concourses at Pennsylvania Station

Interior view of Penn Station's concourses, drenched by the sun due to the greenhouse-inspired design of its glass ceiling.

Explore Penn Station's 1910 debut, a Beaux-Arts jewel by McKim, Mead & White, pivotal in reshaping NYC's transportation and urban fabric

1910: Penn Station: Architectural Masterpiece Shaping NYC's Transit History

Explore Penn Station's 1910 debut, a Beaux-Arts jewel by McKim, Mead & White, pivotal in reshaping NYC's transportation and urban fabric

Aerial photograph  of South Street  Seaport with the East River and Brooklyn Bridge in the background.

1908: Piers Along South Street

Aerial photograph of South Street Seaport with the East River and Brooklyn Bridge in the background.

Aerial view of the Plaza at the foot of the Williamsburg Bridge in Brooklyn, New York.

1906: Williamsburg Bridge Plaza, Brooklyn New York

Aerial view of the Plaza at the foot of the Williamsburg Bridge in Brooklyn, New York.

Chatham Square was an express station on the demolished IRT Third Avenue Line. Its lower level served trains of the IRT Second and Third Avenue Lines.

1905: Elevated (L) Station at Chatham Square

Chatham Square was an express station on the demolished IRT Third Avenue Line. Its lower level served trains of the IRT Second and Third Avenue Lines.



Timeline of New York City: 1905-1910

1905: Ratner's restaurant quickly became a culinary and social landmark in Manhattan's Lower East Side when it opened its doors in 1905. Famous for its Jewish kosher dairy cuisine, it reflected the Eastern European Jewish community's culinary traditions. The establishment was more than a dining spot; it evolved into a social nexus for diverse groups, including writers, actors, and politicians, enhancing its status as a city landmark.

Ratner's significantly influenced New York City's culinary landscape, especially in popularizing Jewish cuisine, until its closure in 2002. Situated in a culturally rich immigrant neighborhood, it played a key role in the economic and cultural vitality of the Lower East Side. The legacy of Ratner's, deeply intertwined with NYC's culinary and cultural history, symbolizes the city's diverse community and culinary richness.

1905: Opened by Alfred Stieglitz and Edward Steichen in 1905, the 291 art gallery, also known as "Little Galleries of the Photo-Secession," at 291 Fifth Avenue in New York City, significantly transformed the American art scene. It introduced modern, avant-garde, and European art to an American audience, previously unexposed to these genres. This gallery was pivotal in promoting and integrating new art forms into the American cultural fabric.

Beyond just showcasing photography, 291 became a vital nexus for cultural exchange and artistic innovation in NYC. It played a crucial role in supporting and elevating emerging artists like Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse, aiding their acceptance in the U.S. Through its influence, 291 helped establish New York City as a global center for art and culture, leaving an enduring impact on the city's artistic development.

1906: On June 25, Stanford White, a prominent architect influential in shaping New York City's skyline, was shockingly murdered at Madison Square Garden, a key city landmark. White, a central figure in New York's social elite, fell victim to Harry Kendall Thaw, a wealthy Pittsburgh millionaire. Thaw's motive was rooted in a personal grudge, linked to White's past romantic involvement with Thaw's wife, Evelyn Nesbit, a well-known showgirl and model.

This high-profile crime, dubbed "The Crime of the Century," captivated national attention, epitomizing the era's blend of wealth, fame, and scandal. The ensuing trials and media uproar underscored the complexities of early 20th-century New York society, weaving a narrative of intrigue and societal dynamics that resonated deeply across the country.

1906: The Hammerstein Ballroom, nestled in the Manhattan Center on West 34th Street, opened in 1906, originally served as the Manhattan Opera House, built by Oscar Hammerstein I. This landmark's establishment significantly enriched New York City's architectural and cultural tapestry, mirroring the dynamic early 20th-century arts scene.

The venue has since been pivotal in shaping the city's entertainment sector. Hosting a variety of events, from opera to modern concerts, it aligns with NYC's status as a global arts and entertainment hub. The Hammerstein Ballroom's continued relevance and versatility in entertainment, spanning over a century, underscore its integral role in the cultural history of New York City.

1906: DeWitt Clinton Park in Manhattan's Hell's Kitchen area, established in 1906, embodies New York City's dedication to enriching its urban landscape with public green spaces. Named after the influential New York Governor and U.S. Senator, DeWitt Clinton, known for his Erie Canal project, the park's creation was a key aspect of the early 20th-century initiative to incorporate public spaces into urban design. This initiative addressed the challenges posed by a burgeoning urban population and the need for urbanization.

The park has since become a vital recreational and cultural hub for the community, reinforcing New York City's commitment to improving residents' quality of life through sustainable urban planning. Its establishment marked a significant step in the city's ongoing efforts to balance urban development with the preservation and creation of vital green spaces, maintaining its status as a valued oasis in Manhattan.

1906: Founded by Julia Barnett Rice in 1906, the Society for the Suppression of Unnecessary Noise in New York City marked a pioneering effort in combating urban noise pollution. As an early advocate for noise abatement, the organization focused on the health and quality of life impacts of excessive noise in an industrializing urban setting, raising public awareness about this environmental issue.

The Society's establishment was instrumental in initiating discussions on environmental noise control, especially in New York City. Influencing early legislation and policies on noise regulation, it set the foundation for modern noise control measures. Its advocacy played a vital role in enhancing public health and improving urban living conditions, underscoring the importance of environmental considerations in urban planning and development.

1906: Established by Italian immigrant Luisa Leone in 1906, Mamma Leone's restaurant quickly emerged as a cornerstone in New York City's culinary scene. Starting as a modest 20-seat eatery in Manhattan, it became celebrated for its authentic Italian cuisine, introducing the city to a genuine taste of Italy. This early establishment played a crucial role in diversifying and evolving New York's food landscape.

Mamma Leone's, renowned for its hearty portions and vibrant ambiance, grew substantially, mirroring the dynamic growth of the city's restaurant industry. It became an iconic culinary destination, appealing to both locals and tourists, and highlighting the significant impact of immigrant contributions to New York's cultural and gastronomic fabric.

1906: The Playground Association of America, established in 1906 and later known as the National Recreation Association, catalyzed a transformative approach to public parks in urban settings, notably in New York City. Advocating for active recreation facilities in city parks, the Association spearheaded a shift from viewing parks as passive green spaces to centers for physical activity and community engagement. This movement marked a significant evolution in public space utilization and perception, aligning with early 20th-century urban development trends.

Influencing New York City's urban planning and public health strategies, the Association's efforts led to the incorporation of playgrounds and recreational facilities in city parks. This alignment with broader social reform movements enhanced urban living quality and addressed public welfare, especially for children. These initiatives were instrumental in promoting community building and adapting to the changing needs of a rapidly growing urban population.

1907: The iconic Times Square Ball drop, inaugurated on December 31, 1907, to celebrate the New York Times building at One Times Square, quickly established itself as a key New Year's Eve tradition. This event, marking the advent of the New Year, set the stage for an enduring annual celebration in Times Square, a hub of commercial and entertainment activity in Manhattan, attracting vast crowds each year.

Over time, the Ball drop has become a major global tourist draw, symbolizing New Year celebrations while reflecting New York City's status as a cultural and entertainment powerhouse. Evolving with technological progress, the event showcases the city's blend of innovation and artistry, continuing to significantly impact NYC's cultural and economic fabric, and becoming an iconic symbol of New Year's Eve worldwide.

1907: The Plaza Hotel, prominently located at Fifth Avenue and Central Park South, opened its doors on October 1, 1907. It quickly became a beacon of luxury and elegance in New York City. With its distinctive architectural style and coveted location made it an essential landmark, symbolizing the city's architectural grandeur in the early 20th century.

The Plaza significantly shaped New York's cultural and social spheres, hosting myriad high-profile events and drawing global tourists and business travelers, thereby boosting the city's economy. As both a New York City Landmark and a National Historic Landmark, the Plaza Hotel's rich legacy is intricately intertwined with New York City's evolution, underscoring its status as a worldwide hub of luxury and hospitality.

1907: The Japan Society, founded in New York City in 1907, has significantly contributed to cultural exchange between Japan and the United States, enhancing mutual understanding and relationships. The Society has been key in introducing and promoting Japanese culture, arts, and traditions in New York, diversifying the city's cultural offerings through various programs and events.

The Society's influence extends to strengthening international relations and providing educational opportunities, enriching New York City's status as a global hub. Initiatives like language classes and cultural workshops have broadened New Yorkers' perspectives on Japanese culture. Additionally, its building, a blend of modernist and traditional Japanese design completed in 1971, stands as an architectural highlight in the city, further enriching New York's architectural tapestry.

1907: Launched by Florenz Ziegfeld Jr. in 1907, the Ziegfeld Follies, a series of Broadway extravaganzas, swiftly transformed New York City's theatrical landscape. Staged in venues like the New Amsterdam Theatre until 1931, these productions were renowned for their opulence, from lavish costumes to elaborate sets, revolutionizing Broadway with a unique fusion of music, dance, and comedy.

The Ziegfeld Follies significantly influenced New York City's cultural and economic realms. They drew large audiences, bolstered the local economy, and became a breeding ground for artistic talent, with many performers rising to fame. Their legacy, a blend of artistic flair and entertainment, remains a cornerstone of New York City's rich theatrical history, reflecting its enduring cultural vibrancy.

1907: The Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House, designed by Cass Gilbert and completed in 1907, is a Beaux-Arts architectural marvel in Lower Manhattan. This building serves as a tribute to Alexander Hamilton and symbolizes New York City's key role in early 20th-century international trade and commerce. Originally a central customs processing hub, it reflects the city's significant position in global economics.

Now home to the National Museum of the American Indian, the Custom House exemplifies New York City's dedication to preserving and repurposing historic structures. This transformation underscores the building's enduring relevance, contributing to the city's cultural and historical richness. As a significant landmark, the Custom House continues to represent New York City's architectural splendor and economic legacy.

1907: Audubon Terrace, constructed in 1907, evolved into a distinguished architectural and cultural hub in New York City's Washington Heights. Designed by Charles Pratt Huntington in the elegant Beaux-Arts style, this complex honors the legacy of the esteemed John James Audubon, underscoring its historical significance. Home to prominent institutions such as the American Geographical Society, the Hispanic Society of America, and the American Numismatic Society.

Audubon Terrace has firmly established itself as a hub for educational and cultural enrichment. It has catalyzed intellectual growth within the community, evolving into a pivotal center for scholarly and artistic pursuits. This development has significantly bolstered the cultural diversity and intellectual vibrancy of both Washington Heights and New York City.

1908: The Singer Building, an architectural marvel located at Liberty Street and Broadway in Lower Manhattan, was constructed in 1908. Designed by Ernest Flagg, this impressive structure held the title of the world's tallest building until 1909, symbolizing the significant architectural and engineering achievements of the early 20th century. Its unique design greatly influenced the developing New York City skyline, marking a period of architectural innovation and urban expansion.

The Singer Building, originally the headquarters of the Singer Manufacturing Company, embodied New York City's economic and industrial expansion in the early 1900s. Its prominence as a skyscraper model was notable, but in 1968, it was demolished to make way for One Liberty Plaza. The Singer Building's life and demolition have played a role in shaping the city's dialogue on historical preservation, leaving a lasting imprint on New York City's architectural legacy.

1909: The Hudson-Fulton Celebration, held from September 25 to October 9, 1909, in New York and New Jersey, was a grand commemoration of two significant historical events: the 300th anniversary of Henry Hudson's discovery of the Hudson River in 1609, and the 100th anniversary of Robert Fulton's first successful commercial application of the paddle steamer with the Clermont in 1807.

Orchestrated by a committee including J.P. Morgan and Andrew Carnegie, the event celebrated the city's maritime heritage and progress. It featured electrifying displays, lighting up landmarks like the Statue of Liberty and Grant's Tomb. The parades, divided into historical and carnival themes, offered insights into New York's evolution from indigenous roots to a 1909 urban powerhouse. Highlights included replicated ships Half Moon and Clermont, and Wilbur Wright's pioneering flights, symbolizing the city's diverse history and technological advancements.

1909: Established in Harlem, the New York Amsterdam News became a pivotal African American voice since its 1909 inception, addressing underrepresentation in mainstream media. This publication not only highlighted significant community issues, events, and perspectives but also marked a turning point in American media, enriching New York City's diverse narrative.

Throughout its existence, the Amsterdam News has significantly chronicled and influenced major events and movements impacting the African American community. Covering the Harlem Renaissance, participating in the Civil Rights Movement, and documenting vital socio-cultural and political shifts, it continues as both a historical and ongoing record, integral to New York City's fabric and the broader African American experience in the U.S.

1909: The Met Life Tower at One Madison Avenue in Manhattan, completed in 1909, redefined New York City's skyline as the world's tallest building until 1913. Designed by Napoleon LeBrun & Sons and inspired by Venice's Campanile, its distinctive clock tower design established it as an architectural icon.

This skyscraper not only showcased early 20th-century architectural prowess but also symbolized the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company's economic strength. As one of the era's leading insurance companies, its headquarters significantly influenced Manhattan's urban development, particularly around Madison Avenue and 23rd Street, cementing NYC's reputation as an architectural innovator and financial powerhouse.

1909: International Women's Day, initiated in response to New York City's 1908 garment workers' strike, commemorates the struggle for women's labor rights. It honors the 15,000 women who marched for better working conditions, marking its first observation on February 28, 1909. This event symbolizes a pivotal moment in the city's labor movement history and highlights the early fight for economic and political rights by female workers.

The 1908 Uprising of the 20,000, a significant labor strike led by women in the garment industry, spanned from November 1909 to February 1910. It resulted in notable improvements in working conditions, higher wages, and reduced hours, despite falling short of achieving union recognition. This strike not only transformed labor practices but also played a foundational role in the early women's labor movement in the U.S., cementing its place in New York City's historical narrative.

1909: The Manhattan Bridge, officially opened to traffic on December 31, stands as the last of the three major suspension bridges constructed across the lower East River in New York City. This final addition to the trio of major suspension bridges notably connects Manhattan and Brooklyn. Initially referred to as "Bridge No. 3" during its planning phase, its design by Leon Moisseiff was celebrated for seamlessly blending functionality with aesthetic appeal, thereby marking a significant infrastructural enhancement.

Spanning 6,855 feet and accommodating pedestrians, cyclists, vehicles, and subway lines, this bridge has been instrumental in New York City's transportation and urban development. Enhancing inter-borough connectivity, it spurred economic growth and urban development. Its iconic status in the city’s skyline, recognized for distinctive architecture, underscores its cultural and historical impact.

1910: On August 9, New York City Mayor William Jay Gaynor was shot by James J. Gallagher, a disgruntled former employee, in Hoboken, New Jersey. While aboard the SS Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse, bound for Europe, Gaynor survived the severe attack but suffered from enduring health complications. This incident, encapsulating the era's tumultuous political landscape marked by anti-corruption struggles, profoundly affected his tenure.

Despite surviving the assassination attempt, Mayor Gaynor continued his duties as mayor. However, his term was overshadowed by ongoing health issues resulting from the gunshot wound. These complications ultimately led to his death on September 10, 1913, over three years following the incident. The event highlighted the turbulent political climate in New York City at the time, characterized by challenges against corruption and a pressing need for reforms in the city’s governance.

1910: Penn Station, designed in the Beaux-Arts style and completed in 1910, emerged as a significant architectural and infrastructural landmark in Midtown Manhattan. Developed by the Pennsylvania Railroad, this major transit hub symbolized an evolution in urban development and transport infrastructure, redefining railway station design and the architectural dynamics of New York City.

Coinciding with its inauguration, the North River Tunnels opened, establishing direct rail connectivity between New York City and New Jersey. Beginning operation on November 27, 1910, these tunnels were pivotal in transitioning from the previous reliance on ferry services and the Hudson and Manhattan Railroad's Uptown Hudson Tubes, which opened in 1908. This advancement marked a significant leap in travel efficiency and connectivity, further solidifying New York City's role as a crucial transportation nucleus and catalyst for regional economic growth.


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Frequently Asked Questions

What Defines History101.nyc? Explore NYC's Historical Journey

Welcome to "History101.NYC," an unparalleled online gallery featuring the beginnings of New York City, exquisitely restored by the experts at Fine Print New York. This exclusive collection vividly resurrects key historical moments, celebrating the city's rich history and diverse cultural heritage. Each meticulously crafted piece in our gallery offers a genuine look into NYC's past, embodying exceptional artistic skill and meticulous attention to detail.

Dive into our archives for a selection of exclusive, premium-quality art prints, encompassing a range of vintage photos, historical images, and rare lithographs unique to our site. These curated artworks narrate the dynamic evolution of the Big Apple, providing history enthusiasts and art collectors with a rare opportunity to own a part of NYC's illustrious legacy. Don't miss the chance to explore and acquire these captivating representations of New York City's historical journey.

Who Are the Founders of History101.nyc? Discover the Creators

Joseph Gornail, a printer/photographer and founder of Fine Print New York, grew up in SoHo, Manhattan. Part of a long lineage of NYC printers, he learned the craft of printing as a teenager. Joseph's pivotal role in the New York printing industry began while working for Dolo Records/Stretch Armstrong in 1996. He then founded All City Marketing & Printing, and in 1999, co-founded the iconic streetwear brand "Orchard Street" with Benjamin Holloway and Greig Bennett. In 2004, Joseph established Fine Print NYC, a top-tier commercial printing company in New York. It launched with a major project for Nike, showcasing resilience and innovation in the digital age.

Steven Garcia, esteemed designer/illustrator and creative director at Fine Print New York, hails from Bushwick, Brooklyn. An alumnus of Fashion Industries High School and F.I.T., Steven's impressive career trajectory includes his tenure as a sought-after professional retoucher and storyboard artist at Saatchi & Saatchi in 1995. His entrepreneurial spirit led to the inception of ShinyDesign in 1998, later aligning with Fine Print in 2004 as their primary design partner. Steven's portfolio boasts collaborations with high-profile brands like Snapple, The Waldorf Astoria, and Sony, making him a prominent figure in New York's advertising and design landscape.

Together, Joseph & Steven spearhead the History101.nyc project, a groundbreaking digital archive since 2006. Their longstanding partnership dates back to 2001, when Joseph managed The New York City Urban Experience, an influential art gallery & museum at 85 South Street, and Steven curated, both contributing to New York City's vibrant cultural scene. This venue, owned by Mike Saes of the Nike Bridge Runners and True Yorkers, was a cornerstone for urban art and history enthusiasts.

What Time Periods, Eras, Decades of NYC History are available?

We cover a vast span of New York City's history, from its inception as New Amsterdam to the vibrant late 1980s. Our artists are actively working on expanding our collection to include photos from the 90s up to the present day.

Here's our current coverage list, showcasing the city's evolution:

Dutch Era: When New York Was New Amsterdam

NYC in the 1600s

Georgian Era

NYC in the 1700s • NYC from 1800 to 1840NYC in the 1840s • 

Victorian Era

NYC in the 1850s • NYC in the 1860s • NYC in the 1870s • NYC in the 1880s

Progressive Era

NYC in the 1890s • NYC from 1900 to 1905 • 1905 to 1910 • 1910 to 1915 • 

World War 1

NYC from 1915 to 1920

Art Deco

NYC from 1920 to 1925 • NYC from 1925 to 1930

Depression Era

NYC from 1930 to 1935 • NYC from 1935 to 1940

World War 2

NYC from 1940 to 1945

MidCentury Modern Era

NYC from 1945 to 1950 • 1950 to 1955 • 1955 to 1960 • 1960 to 1965 • 1965 to 1970

Energy Crisis

NYC from 1970 to 1975 • 1975 to 1980

Reagan Era

NYC from 1980 to 1985 • 1985 to 1990

Each period is richly represented through a variety of art mediums, offering a comprehensive and immersive historical journey of NYC. This chronological approach provides enthusiasts and scholars a unique lens into the city's architectural, cultural, and social developments.

How many historical Images are on this site?

There are currently 755 photos, lithographs, illustrations and maps on this site. Each one has been digitally restored and cleaned up by hand, which makes this collection truly unique.

Can I License Any of These Images?

Digital licenses are available for educational institutions (schools, universities, non-profit organizations). Please contact legal@fineprintnyc.com to discuss conditions for licensing.

NOTE: Any form of commercialization or redistribution of these images, either as tangible goods or third party licenses, is expressly forbidden.

Can I purchase prints of the historical images available on the site?

History101.nyc is an ad-free and non-profit learning resource. We do not sell prints of these images. All operational costs are covered by Fine Print NYC

Do you accept admissions to this collection?

Absolutely! Feel free to send us an email with a preview of the image and we will let you know if it's a good fit for the archives.

How do you handle feedback or corrections regarding the historical context of images?

We welcome any feedback that you may have. If it proves to be historically accurate the changes will be reflected on the site shortly after our correspondence.

Do you collaborate with other historical societies or archives?

We have collaborated with NYC's Municipal Archives, The Tenemant Museum, Bronx Historical Society and a number of prominent NYC photographers to produce a series of limited edition postcards which free of charge, but only available via street distribution, primarily in Manhattan.

Do you also provide image restoration as a service for personal photos?

Yes, we can repair, restore and cleanup your old family photos, slides and negatives. You can either send us the digital files or the original photos to be professionally scanned.

Can you repair any type of image damage?

We can restore just about any level of damage or signs of aging, within reason. As long as most of the photo is intact we cn work with it. The one flaw we cannot fix is source material that is blurry. A poorly take photo can only be improved so much.

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This project is dedicated to exploring New York’s fascinating heritage through the restoration of vintage photographs and prints.